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Jaguar Land Rover asks suppliers to align to 2030 goals

© Shutterstock / FotograFFFJaguar Land Rover logo.

One of the UK’s leading automotive companies Jaguar Land Rover is making good on its commitment to net zero, with news that it is asking its global supply chain to commit to SBTI-approved net zero targets.

Jaguar Land Rover is putting pressure on its more than 5,000 Tier 1 suppliers to commit to net zero.

Collaboration across the supply chain will be key to avoiding negative unintended consequences in the net zero transition.

As more companies put pressure on their supply chains, sustainability changes from a nice to have to part of basic business requirements.

Jaguar Land Rover plans to ask Tier 1 suppliers to set their decarbonisation pathway, report transparently and demonstrate progress towards their targets. This would involve disclosing their carbon reporting and collaborating with their own supply chain to deliver the same reductions. This requirement has been shared with Jaguar Land Rover’s supply network, totalling more than 5,000 companies around the globe.

Achieving net zero is not something that any company will be able to achieve on its own, as the interconnections between different sectors, energy use, materials, and logistics are more mean that operators must share a direction of travel.

Collaboration across Jaguar Land Rover supply chain

Jaguar Land Rover has said that it recognises that its full commitments can only be achieved by working closely with suppliers who share the same vision for change so it’s asking its supplier network – those responsible for products, services and logistics – to align with its 2030 goals while maintaining the same quality.

Through its Reimagine strategy, Jaguar Land Rover is currently undergoing a deep transformation to deliver sustainability-rich modern luxury vehicles by decarbonising its entire value chain, adopting circular economy principles, and transitioning to fully electric product ranges by the end of the decade.

Barbara Bergmeier, Executive Director of Industrial Operations, Jaguar Land Rover, said: “Fulfilling our SBTi commitments and achieving carbon net zero emissions across our entire supply chain by 2039 are the driving forces in Jaguar Land Rover’s industrial strategy.

“We can only meet these ambitious targets together, which is why we’re inviting suppliers to join us on this challenging but exciting journey, strengthening existing relationships to enable all parties to achieve significant, quantifiable goals.

Jaguar Land Rover has committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions across its operations by 46% by 2030. In addition, the company will cut average vehicle emissions across its value chains by 54%, including a 60% reduction throughout the use phase of its vehicles.

The goals, which are approved by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi), confirm the company’s pathway to a 1.5°C emissions reduction in line with the Paris Agreement. The commitment by Jaguar Land Rover meets the most ambitious goal set in Paris.

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